Archive

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Ukrainian Summer Vacation Guide 2011

July 26th, 2011 1 comment

While in Ukraine the government is cancelling the 20th anniversary of Independence Day celebrations all over the country over ‘auserity’, the diaspora can still enjoy events happening in North America this season:

 

July 29-31

Canada’s National Ukrainian Festival (CNUF)

Dauphin, MB

In the fresh air and sunshine, enjoy the incredible view and watch the world-class grandstand shows from the only 11,000-seat, hillside amphitheatre in Canada. Authentic, rich, uniquely Ukrainian and ultimately… delicious! Excite your senses with our all-day-available traditional cuisine. As we tell our stories through costume, song and dance, you will literally see and feel the past come alive. For one whole weekend, escape to become immersed in a new adventure. Let us put a fiddle in your hands, show you a few steps and teach you some Ukrainian songs. Then celebrate with us at the nightly Zabavas; parties thrown in honour of our guests… you!

http://www.cnuf.ca

 

 

July 30 – August 1

Heritage Festival

Edmonton, AB

The 36th anniversary Edmonton Heritage Festival showcasing Canada’s vibrant multicultural heritage will feature 64 pavilions representing over eighty-five cultures from all over the world. The Ukraine Pavilion’s theme is 120 years of Ukrainian Settlement in Alberta. Admission is FREE. Since there is no public parking at Hawrelak Park, a free private shuttle service will be provided from St. Vladimir Parish Church Parking Lot (12726 – 119 Street). Free public transportation by (ETS) is available from 4 designated sites.

http://www.heritage-festival.com/pavilions/61/

 

August 7-13

Folklorama

Winnipeg, MB

Experience everything Ukraine has to offer. Come and enjoy a variety of music, song and dance from our energetic performing groups while sampling traditional food including varenyky (potato-filled dumplings) and holubtsi (rice-stuffed cabbage). Try a Lvivs’ke pyvo (beer) or a Ukrainian crantini – otherwise known as our Kalyna Malyna.

Visit our cultural display to learn about Ukrainian bard Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861), an artist and poet whose works have been translated into many languages and whose statue is found in many countries around the world and locally on the grounds of the Manitoba Legislature.

After the show, enjoy a slice of torte or cheesecake while your children have fun creating a cultural craft. Don’t miss our late night party on Friday and Saturday. Doors close at 12:00 midnight but we continue dancing until 1:30am.

http://www.folklorama.ca/index.php?option=com_pavilion&view=pavilion&Itemid=54&id=40

 

August 7

Ukrainian Day Festival

Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, Alberta

Every summer thousands of people gather for the annual Ukrainian Day Festival held at the Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village. This event has a 35 year history of bringing together families from all across east-central Alberta along with tourists and the general public for a day celebrating all things Ukrainian. From arts, cultural learning and children’s activities to great food, family reunions, unique pioneer experiences and a showcase of Ukrainian performers, Ukrainian Day has something for everyone

http://www.uccab.ca/UkrainianDay/

 

August 18–21

St. Josaphat Ukrainian Festival

Rochester, NY

The  St.  Josaphat’s  Ukrainian  Festival  was  established  in  1973  as  an  effort  to  introduce  Ukrainian  Arts  and  Crafts,  Ukrainian  food,  and  Ukrainian  music  and  dance  to  the  Rochester  community.   Since  its  inception  the  Festival  has  offered  tradition  Ukrainian  foods  such  as  Varenyky  (or  pyrohy  or  pierogies)  a  potato  and  cheese  dumpling,  Holubets  (stuffed  cabbage  rolls),  Kovbasa  (Ukrainian  sausage),  Kapusta  (Ukrainian  style  sauerkraut)  and  Borsch  (beet  soup)  to  the  public. The  Festival  also  has  a  number  of  vendors  who  display  a  variety  of  Ukrainian  Arts  and  Crafts  such  as  ceramics,  embroidery,  wood  carvings,  jewelry  and  Ukrainian  Easter  eggs. The  Ukrainian  Stage  offers  a  variety  of  entertainment  including  Tradition  Ukrainian  Folk  Dancers  and  Singers  both  from  Rochester,  New York  and  Canada.

http://www.rochesterukrainianfestival.com/

 

August 20

Ukrainian Fall Fest

Regina, SK

Ukrainian Canadian Congress-Regina Branch proudly announces its annual outdoor cultural festival! The event aims to celebrate Ukrainian-Canadian culture and recognize its people’s contributions to Canadian society at all levels.  UCC Regina Branch coordinates the activities for 19 Ukrainian cultural organizations of very dedicated volunteers in our city and this event!  Come and Celebrate with us! Bring a lawnchair for your seating comfort!

http://uccruff.ca/

 

August 20

Independence Day Celebration in Toronto

Toronto, ON

All day at Centennial Park in Etobicoke

Official opening at 1:00 pm

Organized by UCC-Toronto

http://www.ucc.ca/2011/07/25/ukrainian-independence-day-celebrations-centennial-park/

 

August 21

Ukrainian Folk Festival

Horsham, Pa

Sunday, August 21, 2011, 12:00 noon. The 20th Annual Ukrainian Folk Festival, celebrating Ukraine’s Independence Day, will be held at the Ukrainian American Sport Center — Tryzub (www.tryzub.org) , County Line and Lower State Roads, Horsham, PA.

Exciting, spectacular, dazzling, breathtaking, exhilarating, spirited, soulful, enchanting, captivating, and intriguing – modest words which describe but by no means capture the essence of Ukrainian folk art, music, and dance. From the rich color and deep symbolism of the delicate “pysanka” (Ukrainian Easter Egg) to the thunderous, climatic, power, rhythm and strength of “HOPAK” – the world’s most exciting ethnic dance, and every brilliant “Kolomiyka” (polka) and soulful folk song in between, we invite you to experience the TWENTIETH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN FOLK FESTIVAL, celebrating the anniversary of our ancestral homeland’s independence. Enjoy a festival stage show, a public dance, Ukrainian foods and baked goods, BBQ pit, kid’s fun area, and Ukrainian hospitality.

http://www.tryzub.org/ukrainian-festival-2011.php

 

August 28

Independence Day Celebration in Edmonton

Edmonton, AB

20th Anniversary of Ukraine’s Independence. Celebration will take place at the Ukrainian Youth Unity Complex at 9615-153 Avenue, Sunday, August 28, 2011 at 2:30 p.ml.

http://www.ucc.ca/2011/07/15/20th-anniversary-celebration-of-ukraines-independence-in-edmonton/

 

August 28

Friends’ Ukrainian Music Festival

Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Village, Alberta

Catch the musical magic at the Friends’ Ukrainian Music Festival featuring an array of the region’s finest Ukrainian folk musicians. This dynamic event encompasses an abundance of entertainment, exhibits, children’s activities, a village market, and delicious foods. Visit the Historic Village where you can enjoy wagon rides and chat with historic settlers as they go about their daily routines.

http://www.ukrainianvillage.ca

 

August 28

Ukrainian Day at Golden Gate Park

San Francisco, CA

1:00 PM 3:00 PM

Ukrainian Cultural Program for Commemorating of 20th Anniversary of
Independence of Ukraine

More info will be soon
E-mail ukrainianheritageclubofnc@yahoo.com

 

September 9 – 11

Montreal Ukrainian Festival

Montreal, PQ

Quebec’s Ukrainian community is 18,000 strong with active members in the development of Quebec in areas of art, culture, politics and business. In Canada, Ukrainians constitute more than 1,000,000 in population. Ukraine is an independent democratic state in Eastern Europe with more than 50 million people living in an area of 603,700 sq. km, an area larger than France and fifth in size by population in Europe.

Festival Objectives:

  • To organize a festival as a venue to introduce Ukrainian culture and heritage to the general population in the province of Quebec
  • To showcase the best of the Ukrainian community, traditions, performing arts and cuisine
  • To seek out Quebecers of Ukrainian descent who, over the years, have moved away from social and community activities and inspire them to a higher level of involvement within the community
  • To give visibility to social, community, educational & cultural organizations as well as professional and business services
  • To reactivate participation of young Ukrainians in mainstream community establishments and organizations
  • To promote the achievements of Ukrainians living in the province of Quebec by displaying their contributions to Canadian society in culture and business
  • To be financially self-sufficient

http://www.ukefestmontreal.org

 

 

September 10 – 11

Ukrainian Festival 35th Annual

Baltimore, MD

Baltimore Ukrainian Festival Committee works to share the Ukrainian heritage & culture by providing the following:

  • Live Entertainment: Traditional Ethnic Dancers, Musicians & Singers
  • Serve traditional foods, breads & beverages of Ukraine the bread basket of Europe
  • Ukrainian Folk Arts:  Paintings, Carved Wood & PSYANKY Egg Demonstrations
  • Novelties: Ceramics, Embroidery Clothing, Jewelry, & Religious artifacts
  • History of Ukraine – Famine, Chernobyl, Orange Revolution

http://www.ukrainianfestival.net

 

September 12

Independence Day Celebration in Calgary

Calgary, AB

1pm at UKRAINIAN PIONEER PARK at Seventh Avenue and Sixth Street N. E. across the street from the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary Ukrainian Catholic Church in Calgary.

Sponsored by the Ukrainian Youth Association “CYM” a member of the Calgary Branch of the Ukrainian Canadian Congress

For more information call Oleksandr (403) 250-5087 or Halya (403) 276-1835

http://www.ucc.ca/2011/07/20/celebration-of-ukraines-20th-year-of-independence-in-calgary/

 

September 16 – 18

Ukrainian Festival

Toronto, ON

The Festival was born in 1995 as the result of the twinning of Toronto and Kyiv. It then came under the umbrella of Ukrainian Canadian Congress Toronto Branch as one of its projects.  While attendance in the first year was estimated at 3,000, within ten years the Festival has grown to attract audiences of 350,000.

The Toronto Ukrainian Festival is a celebration of Toronto’s diversity. It has established itself as one of the premier Ukrainian festivals in North America. The Festival takes pride in showcasing contemporary professional and amateur artists and performers of Ukrainian heritage who celebrate Ukrainian culture through music, dance and visual arts.

Throughout its thirteen year history, the Festival has hosted Prime Ministers, federal, provincial and municipal politicians. The annual parade has been honoured with Festival Parade Marshals such media celebrities Luba Goy, Ted Woloshyn, actress Mimi  Kuzyk, community activist Marika Szkambara, former Ontario Education Minister Gerard Kennedy, former Prime Minister John Turner, Senator Raynell Andreychuk, Mississauga News Publisher Ron Lenyk and Canada’s rock n roll legend Randy Bachman.

http://www.ukrainianfestival.com

Share
Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Today is the 197th birthday of Taras Shevchenko

March 9th, 2011 No comments

Courtesy: maupictures.ca

Today is the 197th birthday of Taras Shevchenko (1814-1861). Read about his life and his artistic works including the poems that helped shape Ukrainian literature and language.

Share
Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Anyone notice this on The Simpsons last night?

December 6th, 2010 No comments

vlcsnap-2010-12-06-22h28m58s194

For anyone who’s curious as to meaning of this picture, it’s a sarcastic statement on the relationship of President Roosevelt & Joseph Stalin just after WW2:

All three leaders were trying to establish an agenda for governing post-war Germany. Churchill’s attitude towards the Soviet Union differed vastly from that of Roosevelt, with the former believing Stalin to be a "devil"-like tyrant leading a vile system.[1] In 1942, U.S. Ambassador to the Soviet Union William Christian Bullitt, Jr.‘s thesis prophesied the "flow of the Red amoeba into Europe". Roosevelt responded to Bullitt, Jr. with a statement summarizing his rationale for war time relations with Stalin:[2]

“I just have a hunch that Stalin is not that kind of a man. … I think that if I give him everything I possibly can and ask for nothing from him in return, noblesse oblige, he won’t try to annex anything and will work with me for a world of democracy and peace.”   Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1943

Roosevelt met Stalin’s price, hoping the USSR could be dealt with via the United Nations. Later, many Americans considered the agreements of the Yalta Conference were a "sellout", encouraging Soviet expansion of influence to Japan and Asia, and because Stalin eventually violated the agreements in forming the Soviet bloc. Furthermore, the Soviets had agreed to join the United Nations, given the secret understanding of a voting formula with a veto power for permanent members of the Security Council, thus ensuring that each country could block unwanted decisions.

At the time, the Red Army had occupied and held much of Eastern Europe with military three times greater than Allied forces in the West. The Declaration of Liberated Europe did little to dispel the sphere of influence agreements that had been incorporated into armistice agreements.

Share
Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Ukraine honors victims of Babi Yar – not only Jews but thousands of Ukrainians were murdered there too

October 5th, 2010 2 comments

At the end of last week Ukraine honored the victims of Nazi mass murders in Babi Yar during WW2:

President Viktor Yanukovych, government officials and relatives of the victims laid flowers at the monument to those killed by the Nazis in the Babi Yar ravine in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev.

More than 33,700 Jews were shot in Babi Yar over the course of two days, beginning Sept. 29, 1941, one of the most horrific killings of the Holocaust.

Yet the killing did not stop there, as the continued Nazi occupation of Ukraine resulted in tens of thousands of more deaths:

In the ensuing months, the ravine was filled with some 100,000 bodies, including those of non-Jewish Kiev residents and Red Army prisoners of the Nazis.

Mass executions at Babi Yar continued up until the German forces departed from Kiev. On January 10, 1942 about 100 sailors from a military flotilla were executed there. In addition, Babi Yar became a place of execution of residents of five Gypsy camps. According to various estimates, during 1941—1943 between 70,000- 200,000 Roma people were rounded up and murdered at Babi Yar. Patients of the Ivan Pavlov Psychiatric Hospital were gassed and then dumped into the ravine. Thousands of other Ukrainians were killed at Babi Yar. Among those murdered were 621 members of the Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN). Ukrainian poet and activist Olena Teliha and her husband, renowned bandurist Mykhailo Teliha, were murdered there on February 21, 1942.

In the two years that followed, Russians, Ukrainians, Gypsies, and people of all nationalities were murdered in Babyn Yar. The belief that Babyn Yar is an exclusively Jewish grave is wrong… It is an international grave. Nobody will ever determine how many and what nationalities are buried there, because 90% of the corpses were burned, their ashes scattered in ravines and fields.

[Day Weekly]

So let us not forget the victims of Babi Yar, as many of them were Ukrainians as well.

Share
Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Vegreville Pysanky Festival this weekend!

July 2nd, 2010 No comments

Just a quick reminder that the Vegreville Pysanka Festival is happening this weekend:

The 37th Annual Vegreville  Pysanka Festival!

July 2, 3, 4, 2010

The Vegreville Cultural Association welcomes one and all, participants, competitors, performers, guests and volunteers to Canada`s showcase of Ukrainian Culture. The festival is a unique cultural event drawing in visitors from near and far, and these 3 days will again display the finest Ukrainian Culture.

Experience the thrill of watching youthful competitors, novices, and seasoned veterans alike, and admire their efforts expressing their joy in life and their pride in their heritage.

Kick up your heels until the wee hours at the Friday and Saturday dances, witness the spectacle of an impromptu Hopak. Visit the cultural handicrafts exhibits and marvel at the intricate patterns of embroidery and pysanky.

Relax amid the hustle and bustle and listen to local bands, explore family history at the Trace you Ukrainian Roots Display. Watch a blacksmith draw a red hot iron from the fire and masterfully shape-it, part of our pioneer demonstrations.

Satisfy your hunger pangs with a plateful of pyrohy and kubasa.

http://www.pysankafestival.com

Share
Categories: Uncategorized Tags: