Category Archives: weekend-watching

Weekend watching: Holodomor featured on UK game show

The Gareth Jones memorial website run by his great nephew Nigel Colley posted a clip last week from a popular game show University Challenge last week that asked participants “killed in 1935, the Welsh journalist Gareth Jones was posthumously awarded which country’s medal of freedom award in 2008 for his efforts in publicizing the Holodomor, a famine of 1932 and 33 during which several millions died as a result of policies instituted by Stalin”

 

Unfortunately no one got the answer correct. Laughably upon hearing the word ‘Stalin’ one participant quickly buzzed in his answer of ‘Russia’, but I don’t think there is a single case of Russia awarding anyone any sort of decree for their work denouncing Stalin – especially since Russian schools are now being equipped with new textbooks justifying his millions of murders and praising the dictator.

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Weekend Listening: BBC Documentary – Useful Idiots

For your weekend listening pleasure, the BBC has published a two-part documentary podcast on ‘useful idiots’ – a phrase coined by Lenin about Westerners who endorsed the Soviet Union and its Communist ideologies, usually in the press.

Part One – 22 minutes

The Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw and American journalist Walter Duranty were some of those people who also visited the Soviet Union. They mingled with political leaders, were escorted into the countryside by Joseph Stalin’s secret police, and returned home to speak and write of ‘a land of hope’ with ‘evils retreating before the spread of communism’.

However as stories mounted of mass murder and starvation in parts of Russia and the Ukraine, reporters such as Gareth Jones and Malcolm Muggeridge investigated and reported on ‘the creation of one enormous Belsen’. Duranty responded with an article in the New York Times headed ‘Story of the famine is bunk’, and got an exclusive interview with Stalin.

Soon after, Jones died and Muggeridge’s career nose-dived. Duranty was awarded a Pulitzer.

How can intellectual curiosity transform into active promotion of a dangerous lie? Why so many ‘useful idiots’?

Part Two – 22 minutes

BBC – Useful Idiots

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Weekend watching: Canada’s Forgotten Internment Camps

From the Mark News:

Between 1914 and 1920, thousands of Canadians of Ukrainian and Eastern European descent were imprisoned in internment camps across Canada, simply on the basis of their origins. For decades, their stories were buried under fear and shame. The Canadian government has finally recognized the internment operations, and yet it remains an unknown chapter in our nation’s history.

Read more

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Weekend watching: Holodomor testimonies

I stumbled upon a few really good Holodomor testimonies that I thought I’d share with you. These interviews were conducted in Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine, and was conducted by the DNK Group and Mark Silberman.

Olga Kamnads’ka Holodomor Testimony

This is testimony of Holodomor survivor Olga Kamnads’ka. The Holodomor genocide occured in Ukraine in 1932-1933. Pani (Mrs.) Olga Kamnads’ka was born in 1926. She and her family left Ukraine at the time of the Holodomor in order to escape from hunger and repressions.

Mykola Antonovich Mykolaenko Holodomor Testimony

This is testimony of Holodomor survivor Mykola Antonovich Mykolaenko. The Holodomor genocide occured in Ukraine in 1932-1933. Pan (Mr.) Mykola Antonovich Mykolaenko was born in 1919. He is a writer and a poet, and is a member of the National Writers Union in Ukraine. He lived in Kryvy Rih at the time of the Holodomor.


This is testimony of Holodomor survivor Grygory Oleksiyovich Simak. The Holodomor genocide occured in Ukraine in 1932-1933. Pan (Mr.) Grygory Oleksiyovich Simak was born in 1919. He is a member of the National Union of Journalists in Ukraine. He lived in the Spasske village (Dnipropetrovsk region) at the time of the Holodomor.

Raisa Pavlovna Radchenko Holodomor testimony
This is testimony of Holodomor survivor Raisa Pavlovna Radchenko. The Holodomor genocide occured in Ukraine in 1932-1933. Pani (Mrs.) Raisa Pavlovna Radchenko was born in 1919. She was a sciescientist and a professor. She lived in the Sukhaya Balka village at the time of the Holodomor.
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