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Happy Ukrainian Heritage Day Ontario!

September 6th, 2013 No comments

imageNow in it’s 3rd year in law, Ukrainians all over Ontario celebrate their heritage Saturday as part Ukrainian Heritage Day. Queen’s Park (Ontario’s legislature) will hold a tribute this afternoon:

September 6, 2013 @ 2:00 pm

Queen’s Park, Toronto
111 Wellesley Street West
Toronto,ON
Canada


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Keynote Speaker: Marta Dyczok PhD (History and Political Science Professor, Western University)

The program at Queen’s Park will commemorate the 3rd Annual Ukrainian Heritage Day in Ontario in collaboration with St. Vladimir’s Institute celebrating 50th years of service.

THE UKRAINIAN CANADIAN CONGRESS, ONTARIO COUNCIL

INVITES YOU TO JOIN US ON THE EVE OF

UKRAINIAN HERITAGE DAY

FRONT LAWN AT QUEEN’S PARK

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH, 2013 AT 2PM

FOR A ONE-HOUR PROGRAM OF TRIBUTES, SONG, READINGS AND STORIES

КОНҐРЕС УКРАЇНЦІВ КАНАДИ

ПРОВІНЦІЙНА РАДА ОНТАРІО ЗАПРОШУЄ ВАС

6 ВЕРЕСНЯ, 2013 – 2:00 ГОД.

БІЛЯ ПАРЛАМЕНТУ ОНТАРІО

RSVP steve.andrusiak@sympatico.ca or call 519-657-5882 for more information

 

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Gearing up for Ukrainian Christmas and Malanka 2013

January 3rd, 2013 No comments

If you’ve already celebrated Christmas and New Years, then I hope you had a great holiday. If you aren’t finished celebrating the holidays yet, you know there is still much more to do on the Julian calendar!

Christmas – January 7th

Starting the night before when the children spot the first star in the sky, Holy Supper (Svyata Vechera) is served with 12 meatless and dairy-free dishes featuring kutya (buckwheat), borscht, fish, varenyky (perogies) and holubtsi (cabbage rolls). Carolling (koliada) is also done from house to house.

An Introduction to Ukrainian Christmas

New Years (Malanka) – January 13th

The last chance to party before Lent, Malanka was once traditionally celebrated with carolers performing small plays or pranks. Now it takes on more modern traditions, usually with a formal celebration at a hall, partying to the countdown towards midnight. Find the nearest Malanka event near you!

An Introduction to Ukrainian New Years (Malanka)
Malanka Guide 2013

Epiphany (Yordan) – January 19th

The final day of the Christmas season and one of the greatest feasts commemorates the baptism of Christ in the river Jordan by St. John the Baptist. On this day, it is the custom to bless water— a river, a lake, or the sea. or now in modern churches, a vessel of water — in a great ceremony including a procession with the carrying of banners and the cross. After the meal on Epiphany Eve, the Christmas tree would be taken down and the didukh would have been carried out and burned in the orchard or pasture.

An introduction to the Epiphany (Yordan)

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Malanka Guide 2012/2013

December 18th, 2012 No comments

Planning on ringing in the Ukrainian new year: Malanka? Learn all about it, and check out this Malanka guide to find an event near you:

 

 

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An introduction to the Epiphany (Yordan)

January 19th, 2012 No comments

Yordan (Epiphany) – January 19th

The final day of the Christmas season and one of the greatest feasts of the Eastern Church (celebrated since the second century) is Epiphany or Yordan. It commemorates the baptism of Christ in the river Jordan by St. John the Baptist when God appeared in the three Persons. As Jesus was standing in the water, the Holy Ghost in the appearance of a dove was seen above Him, while the voice of God the Father was heard to say, "This is my beloved Son in Whom l am well pleased!"

On this day, it is the custom to bless water— a river, a lake, or the sea. or now in modern churches, a vessel of water — in a great ceremony including a procession with the carrying of banners and the cross. In Ukraine and sometimes in communities in the U.S. and Canada where Ukrainians had settled, this blessing of water was held outside at a local body of water such as a river or lake. The men of the community would build a large cross of ice blocks near where the water was blessed and dyed it red with beet kvas (a fermented beet juice). The incensing of the water by the priest signifies the descent of the Holy Ghost to Christ during His baptism. During the ceremony, three special candles are immersed in the water; this is to remind us that through Christ’s baptism our sins are destroyed and forgiven. After the ceremony, the people take some of the blessed holy water to keep in their homes during the coming year.

After the meal on Epiphany Eve, the Christmas tree would be taken down and the didukh would have been carried out and burned in the orchard or pasture.

 

The Blessing of the Home

It is the custom on Epiphany after the blessing of the water or in the days following this feast, for the priest to visit his parishioners to their home with holy water. In some areas, such as when distances visiting all the homes difficult, the father of the family may be the omwho blesses the home.

The home is tidied and prepared in advance for this visit, for it would not be right to not have the home in order. When the priest comes, he is accompanied by one of the family the oldest or the youngest through the house. While he sprinkles the rooms with Holy \X/art-r blessed on Yorclan, the priest prays that the home is kept a place of love and security for the family that lives there and that the family he protected from evil of body and soul and be given abundantly of Godk goodness health, hope, and happiness, courage and confidence, awareness and assurance of His lasting Rove and presence.

This ceremony of the blessing of the home signifies the new beginning of both the new year and of baptism when the soul is cleansed.

 

The Feast of St. ]ohn the Baptist – January 20th

This feast is another synaxis, or day commemorating one associated with the feast of the previous day, as St. ]ohn the Baptist was present when Christ was at the river Jordan. On this day, the kolach which was on the table throughout the days between Christmas Eve and Yordan was taken out at daylight by the father and fed to the cattle to "last them until the new bread."

Thus ends the holy clays of the Christmas season. Following this time, there is a new period of marriages, up until the beginning ofLent and the greatest holy day of all, Easter.

Taken from ‘Ukrainian Christmas – Traditions, Folk Customs, and Recipes’ by Mary Ann Woloch Vaughn

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It’s Easter this Sunday!

April 19th, 2011 No comments

Don’t forget it’s Easter this Sunday for both the Gregorian and Julian calendars. You can read up on our Easter Sunday primer to refresh your memory, and get some varenyky recipes and some odd tips for making Paska from the Canadian Press (doesn’t everyone bake them in old cans?). There are also loads of authentic recipes on this Ukrainian cooking forum.

While I wasn’t able to promote all the local Easter festivals that had happened this weekend, there’s still time to get some of your favourite foods from popular stores (in Toronto there’s Future Bakery, Natalie’s Kitchen and Vatra to name a few).

If you’re going to dabble in some pysanky making, you can still get supplies from local vendors (in Toronto Koota Ooma comes to mind), as well online from Ukrainian Bookstore. Get inspired by some news stories from great pysanky makers and some in training too! For a good laugh there’s always my documented attempt from a few years ago.

And in all the food eating and pysanky making this long weekend, don’t forget to remember the religious aspect of the holiday. For the past two years both Easters have been on the same day, but next year the Gregorian calendar will have Easter fall on April 8, 2012 and Julian on April 15, 2012.

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